Charters

Charters
6/27/2017

Woodstock, Town of

County of Shenandoah

History of incorporation

Established 1761, c. 12, in the County of Frederick.

Incorporated as the Town of Woodstock in the County of Shenandoah, 1872, c. 97.

Charter, 1874, c. 63; repealed 1922, c. 412.

Current charter

Charter, 1922, c. 412.

Amendments to current charter

1924, c. 361 (§ 4)

1926, c. 29 (§ 4)

1928, c. 354 (§ 4)

1940, c. 61 (§ 4)

1960, c. 431 (§§ 4, 4a [added], 4b [added], 4c [added], 4d [added])

1962, c. 22 (§ 4a)

1972, c. 40 (§ 4a (1) [added])

1978, c. 112 (§ 4c)

1983, c. 10 (§ 4b (1) [added])

§ 1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of Virginia, That all contracts and obligations of the Town of Woodstock heretofore and hereafter made by the present council and government by them while in office, and former councils in the corporate name of the council of the Town of Woodstock, not inconsistent with this charter and the general laws and Constitution of the State, shall be and are hereby declared to be valid and legal. (1922, c. 412)

§ 2. The town corporate.

The inhabitants of the Town of Woodstock, Virginia, as its limits are or hereafter may be established, shall be a body, politic and corporate, to be known and designated as the Town of Woodstock, and as such shall have and may exercise all power as now or hereafter may be conferred upon or delegated to town under the Constitution and laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia, as fully and completely as though said powers were specifically enumerated herein and no enumeration of particular powers by this charter shall be held to be exclusive. (1922, c. 412)

§ 3. The town boundaries.

The outside boundaries or corporate limits of the said town are as follows:

Beginning at a planted stone at the north end of Water street and at the east edge thereof, one of the old corners to the original town, and extending thence along the line of M. V. French's estate, and with the boundaries of that part annexed to the said town in 1908, south forty-six and three-quarters east three poles to a planted stone in said French's line; thence north twenty-three degrees ten feet east ninety-seven poles to a marked gate post at the east side of the gate and on the south side of the road called Mill road; thence along the south side of the said road north sixty-four and one-quarter west twenty-six and nine-tenth poles to a small marked cedar tree on the south side of the said road; thence north forty-nine and one-half west seventeen poles to a marked telephone pole on the west edge of the Valley turnpike; thence over the land of Peter Supinger's estate north forty-nine and one-half west nineteen poles to a planted stone on the west side of the railroad, in George K. Logan's line; thence along the west limits of the railroad south forty-eight west sixteen poles to an anchor post a corner to said Logan and to the Supinger land; thence along the said Supinger land north forty-five and one-half west fifty-five and six-tenths poles to a planted stone on the east edge of the Middle road; thence along the east edge of the said Middle road south forty-nine west fifty-four poles to a planted stone at the old corner of the original town; thence with the original lines north forty-five and one-quarter west one hundred and thirty-four and four-tenths poles, along the south edge of the Fairview road most of the way, to a planted stone near a large oak tree at the north corner of the original town and on the south side of the Fairview road and on the west edge of the west alley of the said town, thence with the western limits of the said town, being the original line, and on the west side of the said alley or street, south forty-four and three-quarters west six hundred seventy-six and one-half poles to a planted stone at the south end of the said West street or alley, and on the south side of the South street or alley and near the bank of a small pond by a small white oak; thence with the lines of several tracts of farm land, south forty-five and one-quarter east two hundred twenty-eight and six-tenth poles to a planted stone near a pine stump one of the old corners of the town; thence north forty-four and three-quarters east three hundred thirty-seven and seven-tenths poles to a planted stone near the west edge of the railroad limits; thence crossing the railroad, the Valley turnpike and running with various farm lines, south forty-six east two hundred and thirty-one poles to a planted stone by a large stump at the corner of the fence; thence north forty-four east one hundred twenty-one and two-tenths poles to a planted stone by a large white oak tree at the junction of the two roads leading from the river section towards the said town; thence along the south edge of the said main road leading to the town, north forty-seven west one hundred twenty-three and six-tenths poles to a planted stone at the angle of the said road and at the south side thereof and at the mouth of the street leading to the Indian spring; thence along the west side of the said main road north twenty-eight and three-quarters east fifteen and five-tenths poles to a planted stone on the west side of the said road; thence north twenty and three-quarters east fourteen poles to a limestone rock with a hold drilled into it on the south side of South street of the town, and on the west side, and at the south end of Water street, corner to Allen's addition or subdivision; thence south fifty-seven and one-quarter east two and two-tenths poles to a planted stone by a large limestone rock on the east side of said Water street; thence with the east edge of said Water street north thirty-five east one hundred eighty-six and seven-tenths poles to the place of beginning, containing within the said boundaries, including all the in-lots, all the out-lots, and all the streets and alleys of the said town, one thousand three hundred and forty-five acres, three roads, twenty-four square poles, more or less. (1922, c. 412)

§ 4. The powers set forth in §§ 15-77.1 through 15-77.70 of the Code of Virginia as in force on January 1, 1960, are here by conferred on and vested in the Town of Woodstock, Virginia. (1922, c. 412; 1924, c. 361; 1926, c. 29; 1928, c. 354; 1940, c. 61; 1960, c. 431)

§ 4a. A mayor and six councilmen, all of whom shall be electors of the town, shall be elected at the regular municipal election on the second Tuesday in June, 1962. The mayor shall be elected for a term of four years. The three members receiving the greatest number of votes in said election shall serve as members of the council for terms of four years each. The remaining three members shall serve for terms of two years each. At the regular municipal election to be held on the second Tuesday in June, 1964, and every two years thereafter, three councilmen shall be elected for terms of four years each. Terms of office shall begin on the first day of September next following their election. Each councilman and the mayor elected as hereinabove provided shall serve for the term stated or until his successor has been elected and qualified. The council shall be a continuing body, and no measure pending before such body shall abate or be discontinued by reason of expiration of term of office or removal of any of its members. Any vacancy in the council shall be filled within thirty days, for the unexpired term, by a majority vote of the remaining members; provided, that if the term of office to be filled does not expire for two years or more after the nest regular election for councilmen, following such vacancy and such vacancy occurs in time to permit it, then the council shall fill such vacancy only for the period then remaining until such election, and a qualified person shall then be elected by the qualified voters and shall from and after the date of his election and qualification succeed such appointee and serve the unexpired term. The number of candidates for council equal to the number of vacancies to be filled for full terms receiving the highest number of votes shall be entitled to such full terms and the candidate receiving the next highest number of votes shall be entitled to the unexpired term caused by such vacancy. (1960, c. 431; 1962, c. 22)

§ 4a (1). Notwithstanding any other provision of this charter or any amendment thereto, that beginning in the year of 1972, all municipal elections in the Town of Woodstock as provided in this charter shall be held on the first Tuesday in May in each respective election year, and terms of office shall begin on the first day of July next following such election. (1972, c. 40)

§ 4b. The council may, without adopting any of the alternative forms of government provided by law, nevertheless employ a person, who may or may not be a resident or qualified voter of such city or town or of this State, to be known as the "Town Manager," who shall, under the control of the council, have general charge and management of the administrative affairs and work of the town and shall perform such other duties as may be required of him. He shall receive such salary as may be allowed him by the council and may be dismissed at any time by the council. (1960, c. 431)

§ 4b(1). Voting by the mayor.

The mayor shall preside over the council, but shall not be entitled to vote on any question except in the case of a tie. (1983, c. 10)

§ 4c. Proposed ordinances shall be introduced in written or printed form, and the enacting clause of all ordinances shall substantially be "Be it Ordained by the Council of the Town of Woodstock," and all ordinances shall be read at two meetings not less than a week apart, one of which shall be a regular meeting and the other of which may be either an adjourned or called meeting, provided the requirement of a second reading may be confined to the reading of the title only upon the vote of four members of the council; provided, further, that emergency measures may be passed upon a single reading. The vote of each member of the council on all ordinances shall be recorded in the minutes. All ordinances passed by the council shall take effect thirty days after the date of passage, unless another later effective date shall be designated therein, except that the council may by affirmative vote of a majority of its members pass emergency measures to take effect immediately upon passage.

Every ordinance upon its final passage shall be recorded in a book kept for the purpose, and shall be authenticated by the signature of the presiding officer and the town clerk.

A record or entry made by the town clerk or a copy of such record or entry duly certified by such clerk shall be prima facie evidence of the terms of the ordinance or any amendment thereof.

All ordinances and resolutions of the council may be read in evidence in all courts and in all other proceedings in which it may be necessary to refer thereto, either from a copy thereof certified by the clerk or from the volume or code of ordinances printed by authority of the council. (1960, c. 431; 1978, c. 112)

§ 4d. The present mayor and councilmen, and all other officers of the Town of Woodstock shall continue to hold office and to perform the duties of their respective offices for the said town for the terms for which they were elected and until their successors be elected and qualify, and all liabilities, actions, claims, contracts heretofore existing under the former charter and amendatory acts under the corporate name of the Town of Woodstock shall remain and continue in force and effect as if this act had not been passed. And all ordinances now in force in the Town of Woodstock, not inconsistent with this charter shall be and remain in full force until altered, amended or repealed by the council of said town. (1960, c. 431)

§ 5. Repealing clause.

All acts and parts of acts in conflict with this charter are hereby repealed and previous charters and amendments thereto in conflict with this charter in the corporate name of the council of the Town of Woodstock are hereby repealed. (1922, c. 412)

§ 6. By reason of the fact that it is necessary for the Town of Woodstock to procure without delay additional water supply, an emergency is hereby declared to exist, and by reason thereof this act shall be in force from its passage. (1922, c. 412)