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Virginia Administrative Code
Title 9. Environment
Agency 25. State Water Control Board
Chapter 870. Chapter 870 Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP) Regulation
1/18/2020

9VAC25-870-400. Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems.

A. Objectives of the stormwater regulations for small MS4s.

1. Subsections A through G of this section are written in a "readable regulation" format that includes both rule requirements and guidance. The recommended guidance is distinguished from the regulatory requirements by putting the guidance in a separate subdivision headed by the word "Note."

2. Under the statutory mandate in § 402(p)(6) of the Clean Water Act, the purpose of this portion of the stormwater program is to designate additional sources that need to be regulated to protect water quality and to establish a comprehensive stormwater program to regulate these sources.

3. Stormwater runoff continues to harm the nation's waters. Runoff from lands modified by human activities can harm surface water resources in several ways including by changing natural hydrologic patterns and by elevating pollutant concentrations and loadings. Stormwater runoff may contain or mobilize high levels of contaminants, such as sediment, suspended solids, nutrients, heavy metals, pathogens, toxins, oxygen-demanding substances, and floatables.

4. The board strongly encourages partnerships and the watershed approach as the management framework for efficiently, effectively, and consistently protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting public health.

B. As an operator of a small MS4, am I regulated under the state's stormwater program?

1. Unless you qualify for a waiver under subdivision 3 of this subsection, you are regulated if you operate a small MS4, including but not limited to systems operated by federal, state, tribal, and local governments, including the Virginia Department of Transportation; and

a. Your small MS4 is located in an urbanized area as determined by the latest decennial census by the Bureau of the Census (If your small MS4 is not located entirely within an urbanized area, only the portion that is within the urbanized area is regulated); or

b. You are designated by the board, including where the designation is pursuant to subdivisions C 3 a and b of this section or is based upon a petition under 9VAC25-870-380 D.

2. You may be the subject of a petition to the board to require a state permit for your discharge of stormwater. If the board determines that you need a state permit, you are required to comply with subsections C through E of this section.

3. The board may waive the requirements otherwise applicable to you if you meet the criteria of subdivision 4 or 5 of this subsection. If you receive a waiver under this section, you may subsequently be required to seek coverage under a state permit in accordance with subdivision C 1 of this section if circumstances change. (See also subdivision E 2 of this section).

4. The board may waive state permit coverage if your MS4 serves a population of less than 1,000 within the urbanized area and you meet the following criteria:

a. Your system is not contributing substantially to the pollutant loadings of a physically interconnected MS4 that is regulated by the board; and

b. If you discharge any pollutants that have been identified as a cause of impairment of any water body to which you discharge, stormwater controls are not needed based on wasteload allocations that are part of an approved "total maximum daily load" (TMDL) that addresses the pollutants of concern.

5. The board may waive state permit coverage if your MS4 serves a population under 10,000 and you meet the following criteria:

a. The board has evaluated all surface waters, including small streams, tributaries, lakes, and ponds, that receive a discharge from your MS4;

b. For all such waters, the board has determined that stormwater controls are not needed based on wasteload allocations that are part of an approved TMDL that addresses the pollutants of concern or, if a TMDL has not been developed or approved, an equivalent analysis that determines sources and allocations for the pollutants of concern;

c. For the purpose of subdivision 5 of this subsection, the pollutants of concern include biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), sediment or a parameter that addresses sediment (such as total suspended solids, turbidity or siltation), pathogens, oil and grease, and any pollutant that has been identified as a cause of impairment of any water body that will receive a discharge from your MS4; and

d. The board has determined that future discharges from your MS4 do not have the potential to result in exceedances of water quality standards, including impairment of designated uses, or other significant water quality impacts, including habitat and biological impacts.

C. If I am an operator of a regulated small MS4, how do I apply for a state permit and when do I have to apply?

1. If you operate a regulated small MS4 under subsection B of this section, you must seek coverage under a state permit issued by the board.

2. You must seek authorization to discharge under a general or individual state permit, as follows:

a. If the board has issued a general permit applicable to your discharge and you are seeking coverage under the general permit, you must submit a registration statement that includes the information on your best management practices and measurable goals required by subdivision D 4 of this section. You may file your own registration statement, or you and other municipalities or governmental entities may jointly submit a registration statement. If you want to share responsibilities for meeting the minimum measures with other municipalities or governmental entities, you must submit a registration statement that describes which minimum measures you will implement and identify the entities that will implement the other minimum measures within the area served by your MS4. The general permit will explain any other steps necessary to obtain permit authorization.

b. (1) If you are seeking authorization to discharge under an individual state permit and wish to implement a program under subsection D of this section, you must submit an application to the board that includes the information required under 9VAC25-870-360 F and subdivision D 4 of this section, an estimate of square mileage served by your small MS4, and any additional information that the board requests. A storm sewer map that satisfies the requirement of subdivision D 2 c (1) of this section will satisfy the map requirement in 9VAC25-870-360 F 7.

(2) If you are seeking authorization to discharge under an individual state permit and wish to implement a program that is different from the program under subsection D of this section, you will need to comply with the state permit application requirements of 9VAC25-870-380 C. You must submit both parts of the application requirements in 9VAC25-870-380 C 1 and 2 by March 10, 2003. You do not need to submit the information required by 9VAC25-870-380 C 1 b and C 2 regarding your legal authority, unless you intend for the state permit writer to take such information into account when developing your other state permit conditions.

(3) If allowed by the board, you and another regulated entity may jointly apply under either subdivision 2 b (1) or (2) of this subsection to be state co-permittees under an individual state permit.

c. If your small MS4 is in the same urbanized area as a medium or large MS4 with a state permit and that other MS4 is willing to have you participate in its stormwater program, you and the other MS4 may jointly seek a modification of the other MS4 state permit to include you as a limited state co-permittee. As a limited state co-permittee, you will be responsible for compliance with the state permit's conditions applicable to your jurisdiction. If you choose this option you will need to comply with the state permit application requirements of 9VAC25-870-380, rather than the requirements of subsection D of this section. You do not need to comply with the specific application requirements of 9VAC25-870-380 C 1 c and d and 9VAC25-870-380 C 2 c (discharge characterization). You may satisfy the requirements in 9VAC25-870-380 C 1 e and 2 d (identification of a management program) by referring to the other MS4's stormwater management program.

d. NOTE: In referencing an MS4's stormwater management program, you should briefly describe how the existing plan will address discharges from your small MS4 or would need to be supplemented in order to adequately address your discharges. You should also explain your role in coordinating stormwater pollutant control activities in your MS4 and detail the resources available to you to accomplish the plan.

3. If you operate a regulated small MS4:

a. Designated under subdivision B 1 a of this section, you must apply for coverage under a state permit or apply for a modification of an existing state permit under subdivision 2 c of this subsection within 180 days of notice, unless the board grants a later date.

b. Designated under subdivision B 1 b of this section, you must apply for coverage under a state permit or apply for a modification of an existing state permit under subdivision 2 c of this subsection within 180 days of notice, unless the board grants a later date.

D. As an operator of a regulated small MS4, what will my MS4 state permit require?

1. Your MS4 state permit will require at a minimum that you develop, implement, and enforce a stormwater management program designed to reduce the discharge of pollutants from your MS4 to the maximum extent practicable (MEP), to protect water quality, and to satisfy the appropriate water quality requirements of the Clean Water Act, the Virginia Stormwater Management Act, and the State Water Control Law. Your stormwater management program must include the minimum control measures described in subdivision 2 of this subsection unless you apply for a state permit under 9VAC25-870-380 C. For purposes of this section, narrative effluent limitations requiring implementation of best management practices (BMPs) are generally the most appropriate form of effluent limitations when designed to satisfy technology requirements (including reductions of pollutants to the maximum extent practicable) and to protect water quality. Implementation of best management practices consistent with the provisions of the stormwater management program required pursuant to this section and the provisions of the state permit required pursuant to subsection C of this section constitutes compliance with the standard of reducing pollutants to the maximum extent practicable. The board will specify a time period of up to five years from the date of state permit issuance for you to develop and implement your program.

2. Minimum control measures.

a. Public education and outreach on stormwater impacts.

(1) You must implement a public education program to distribute educational materials to the community or conduct equivalent outreach activities about the impacts of stormwater discharges on water bodies and the steps that the public can take to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff.

(2) NOTE: You may use stormwater educational materials provided by the state, your tribe, EPA, environmental, public interest or trade organizations, or other MS4s. The public education program should inform individuals and households about the steps they can take to reduce stormwater pollution, such as ensuring proper septic system maintenance, ensuring the proper use and disposal of landscape and garden chemicals including fertilizers and pesticides, protecting and restoring riparian vegetation, and properly disposing of used motor oil or household hazardous wastes. The board recommends that the program inform individuals and groups how to become involved in local stream and beach restoration activities as well as activities that are coordinated by youth service and conservation corps or other citizen groups. The board recommends that the public education program be tailored, using a mix of locally appropriate strategies, to target specific audiences and communities. Examples of strategies include: distributing brochures or fact sheets, sponsoring speaking engagements before community groups, providing public service announcements, implementing educational programs targeted at school-age children, and conducting community-based projects such as storm drain stenciling, and watershed and beach cleanups. In addition, the board recommends that some of the materials or outreach programs be directed toward targeted groups of commercial, industrial, and institutional entities likely to have significant stormwater impacts. For example, providing information to restaurants on the impact of grease clogging storm drains and to garages on the impact of oil discharges. You are encouraged to tailor your outreach program to address the viewpoints and concerns of all communities, particularly minority and disadvantaged communities, as well as any special concerns relating to children.

b. Public involvement/participation.

(1) You must, at a minimum, comply with state, tribal, and local public notice requirements when implementing a public involvement/participation program.

(2) The board recommends that the public be included in developing, implementing, and reviewing your stormwater management program and that the public participation process should make efforts to reach out and engage all economic and ethnic groups. Opportunities for members of the public to participate in program development and implementation include serving as citizen representatives on a local stormwater management panel, attending public hearings, working as citizen volunteers to educate other individuals about the program, assisting in program coordination with other pre-existing programs, or participating in volunteer monitoring efforts. (Citizens should obtain approval where necessary for lawful access to monitoring sites.)

c. Illicit discharge detection and elimination.

(1) You must develop, implement and enforce a program to detect and eliminate illicit discharges (as defined in 9VAC25-870-10) into your small MS4.

(2) You must:

(a) Develop, if not already completed, a storm sewer system map, showing the location of all outfalls and the names and location of all surface waters that receive discharges from those outfalls;

(b) To the extent allowable under state, tribal or local law, effectively prohibit, through ordinance or other regulatory mechanism, nonstormwater discharges into your storm sewer system and implement appropriate enforcement procedures and actions;

(c) Develop and implement a plan to detect and address nonstormwater discharges, including illegal dumping, to your system; and

(d) Inform public employees, businesses, and the general public of hazards associated with illegal discharges and improper disposal of waste.

(3) You need to address the following categories of nonstormwater discharges or flows (i.e., illicit discharges) only if you identify them as significant contributors of pollutants to your small MS4: water line flushing, landscape irrigation, diverted stream flows, rising groundwaters, uncontaminated groundwater infiltration (as defined in 40 CFR 35.2005(20)), uncontaminated pumped groundwater, discharges from potable water sources, foundation drains, air conditioning condensation, irrigation water, springs, water from crawl space pumps, footing drains, lawn watering, individual residential car washing, flows from riparian habitats and wetlands, dechlorinated swimming pool discharges, and street wash water. (Discharges or flows from fire-fighting activities are excluded from the effective prohibition against nonstormwater and need only be addressed where they are identified as significant sources of pollutants to surface waters.)

(4) NOTE: The board recommends that the plan to detect and address illicit discharges include the following four components: (i) procedures for locating priority areas likely to have illicit discharges, (ii) procedures for tracing the source of an illicit discharge, (iii) procedures for removing the source of the discharge, and (iv) procedures for program evaluation and assessment. The board recommends visually screening outfalls during dry weather and conducting field tests of selected pollutants as part of the procedures for locating priority areas. Illicit discharge education actions may include storm drain stenciling; a program to promote, publicize, and facilitate public reporting of illicit connections or discharges; and distribution of outreach materials.

d. Construction site stormwater runoff control.

(1) You must develop, implement, and enforce a program to reduce pollutants in any stormwater runoff to your small MS4 from construction activities that result in a land disturbance of greater than or equal to one acre, or equal to or greater than 2,500 square feet in all areas of the jurisdictions designated as subject to the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area Designation and Management Regulations adopted pursuant to the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act. Reduction of stormwater discharges from construction activity disturbing less than one acre must be included in your program if that construction activity is part of a larger common plan of development or sale that would disturb one acre or more. If the board waives requirements for stormwater discharges associated with small construction activity in accordance with the definition in 9VAC25-870-10, you are not required to develop, implement, and/or enforce a program to reduce pollutant discharges from such sites.

(2) Your program must include the development and implementation of, at a minimum:

(a) An ordinance or other regulatory mechanism to require erosion and sediment controls, as well as sanctions to ensure compliance, to the extent allowable under state, tribal, or local law;

(b) Requirements for construction site operators to implement appropriate erosion and sediment control best management practices;

(c) Requirements for construction site operators to control waste such as discarded building materials, concrete truck washout, chemicals, litter, and sanitary waste at the construction site that may cause adverse impacts to water quality;

(d) Procedures for site plan review which incorporate consideration of potential water quality impacts;

(e) Procedures for receipt and consideration of information submitted by the public; and

(f) Procedures for site inspection and enforcement of control measures.

(3) NOTE: Examples of sanctions to ensure compliance include nonmonetary penalties, fines, bonding requirements and/or state permit denials for noncompliance. The board recommends that procedures for site plan review include the review of individual pre-construction site plans to ensure consistency with VESCP requirements. Procedures for site inspections and enforcement of control measures could include steps to identify priority sites for inspection and enforcement based on the nature of the construction activity, topography, and the characteristics of soils and receiving water quality. You are encouraged to provide appropriate educational and training measures for construction site operators. You may wish to require a stormwater pollution prevention plan for construction sites within your jurisdiction that discharge into your system. (See 9VAC25-870-460 L and subdivision E 2 of this section.) The board may recognize that another government entity may be responsible for implementing one or more of the minimum measures on your behalf.

e. Post-construction stormwater management in new development and redevelopment.

(1) You must develop, implement, and enforce a program to address stormwater runoff from new development and redevelopment projects that disturb greater than or equal to one acre, including projects less than one acre that are part of a larger common plan of development or sale, that discharge into your small MS4. Your program must ensure that controls are in place that would prevent or minimize water quality impacts.

(2) You must:

(a) Develop and implement strategies that include a combination of structural and/or nonstructural best management practices (BMPs) appropriate for your community;

(b) Use an ordinance or other regulatory mechanism to address post-construction runoff from new development and redevelopment projects to the extent allowable under state, tribal or local law; and

(c) Ensure adequate long-term operation and maintenance of BMPs.

(3) NOTE: If water quality impacts are considered from the beginning stages of a project, new development and potentially redevelopment provide more opportunities for water quality protection. The board recommends that the BMPs chosen be appropriate for the local community, minimize water quality impacts, and attempt to maintain pre-development runoff conditions. In choosing appropriate BMPs, the board encourages you to participate in locally based watershed planning efforts that attempt to involve a diverse group of stakeholders, including interested citizens. When developing a program that is consistent with this measure's intent, the board recommends that you adopt a planning process that identifies the municipality's program goals (e.g., minimize water quality impacts resulting from post-construction runoff from new development and redevelopment), implementation strategies (e.g., adopt a combination of structural and/or nonstructural BMPs), operation and maintenance policies and procedures, and enforcement procedures. In developing your program, you should consider assessing existing ordinances, policies, programs and studies that address stormwater runoff quality. In addition to assessing these existing documents and programs, you should provide opportunities to the public to participate in the development of the program. Nonstructural BMPs are preventative actions that involve management and source controls such as: (i) policies and ordinances that provide requirements and standards to direct growth to identified areas, protect sensitive areas such as wetlands and riparian areas, maintain and/or increase open space (including a dedicated funding source for open space acquisition), provide buffers along sensitive water bodies, minimize impervious surfaces, and minimize disturbance of soils and vegetation; (ii) policies or ordinances that encourage infill development in higher density urban areas, and areas with existing infrastructure; (iii) education programs for developers and the public about project designs that minimize water quality impacts; and (iv) measures such as minimization of percent impervious area after development and minimization of directly connected impervious areas. Structural BMPs include: storage practices such as wet ponds and extended-detention outlet structures; filtration practices such as grassed swales, sand filters and filter strips; and infiltration practices such as infiltration basins and infiltration trenches. The board recommends that you ensure the appropriate implementation of the structural BMPs by considering some or all of the following: pre-construction review of BMP designs; inspections during construction to verify BMPs are built as designed; post-construction inspection and maintenance of BMPs; and penalty provisions for the noncompliance with design, construction or operation and maintenance. Stormwater technologies are constantly being improved, and the board recommends that your requirements be responsive to these changes, developments or improvements in control technologies.

f. Pollution prevention/good housekeeping for municipal operations.

(1) You must develop and implement an operation and maintenance program that includes a training component and has the ultimate goal of preventing or reducing pollutant runoff from municipal operations. Using training materials that are available from EPA, state, tribe, or other organizations, your program must include employee training to prevent and reduce stormwater pollution from activities such as park and open space maintenance, fleet and building maintenance, new construction and land disturbances, and stormwater system maintenance.

(2) NOTE: The board recommends that, at a minimum, you consider the following in developing your program: maintenance activities, maintenance schedules, and long-term inspection procedures for structural and nonstructural stormwater controls to reduce floatables and other pollutants discharged from your separate storm sewers; controls for reducing or eliminating the discharge of pollutants from streets, roads, highways, municipal parking lots, maintenance and storage yards, fleet or maintenance shops with outdoor storage areas, salt/sand storage locations and snow disposal areas operated by you, and waste transfer stations; procedures for properly disposing of waste removed from the separate storm sewers and areas listed above (such as dredge spoil, accumulated sediments, floatables, and other debris); and ways to ensure that new flood management projects assess the impacts on water quality and examine existing projects for incorporating additional water quality protection devices or practices. Operation and maintenance should be an integral component of all stormwater management programs. This measure is intended to improve the efficiency of these programs and require new programs where necessary. Properly developed and implemented operation and maintenance programs reduce the risk of water quality problems.

3. If an existing VSMP requires you to implement one or more of the minimum control measures of subdivision 2 of this subsection, the board may include conditions in your state permit that direct you to follow that VSMP's requirements rather than the requirements of subdivision 2 of this subsection. A VSMP is a local, state or tribal municipal stormwater management program that imposes, at a minimum, the relevant requirements of subdivision 2 of this subsection.

4. a. In your state permit application (either a registration statement for coverage under a general permit or an individual permit application), you must identify and submit to the board the following information:

(1) The best management practices (BMPs) that you or another entity will implement for each of the stormwater minimum control measures provided in subdivision 2 of this subsection;

(2) The measurable goals for each of the BMPs including, as appropriate, the months and years in which you will undertake required actions, including interim milestones and the frequency of the action; and

(3) The person or persons responsible for implementing or coordinating your stormwater management program.

b. If you obtain coverage under a general permit, you are not required to meet any measurable goals identified in your registration statement in order to demonstrate compliance with the minimum control measures in subdivisions 2 c through f of this subsection unless, prior to submitting your registration statement, EPA or the board has provided or issued a menu of BMPs that addresses each such minimum measure. Even if no regulatory authority issues the menu of BMPs, however, you still must comply with other requirements of the general permit, including good faith implementation of BMPs designed to comply with the minimum measures.

c. NOTE: Either EPA or the board will provide a menu of BMPs. You may choose BMPs from the menu or select others that satisfy the minimum control measures.

5. a. You must comply with any more stringent effluent limitations in your state permit, including state permit requirements that modify or are in addition to the minimum control measures based on an approved total maximum daily load (TMDL) or equivalent analysis. The board may include such more stringent limitations based on a TMDL or equivalent analysis that determines such limitations are needed to protect water quality.

b. NOTE: The board strongly recommends that until the evaluation of the stormwater program in subsection G of this section, no additional requirements beyond the minimum control measures be imposed on regulated small MS4s without the agreement of the operator of the affected small MS4, except where an approved TMDL or equivalent analysis provides adequate information to develop more specific measures to protect water quality.

6. You must comply with other applicable state permit requirements, standards and conditions established in the individual or general permit developed consistent with the provisions of 9VAC25-31-190 through 9VAC25-31-250, as appropriate.

7. Evaluation and assessment.

a. You must evaluate program compliance, the appropriateness of your identified best management practices, and progress towards achieving your identified measurable goals. The board may determine monitoring requirements for you in accordance with monitoring plans appropriate to your watershed. Participation in a group monitoring program is encouraged.

b. You must keep records required by the state permit for at least three years. You must submit your records to the department only when specifically asked to do so. You must make your records, including a description of your stormwater management program, available to the public at reasonable times during regular business hours (see 9VAC25-870-340 for confidentiality provision). You may assess a reasonable charge for copying. You may require a member of the public to provide advance notice.

c. Unless you are relying on another entity to satisfy your state permit obligations under subdivision E 1 of this section, you must submit annual reports to the department for your first state permit term. For subsequent state permit terms, you must submit reports in years two and four unless the department requires more frequent reports. As of the start date in Table 1 of 9VAC25-31-1020, all reports submitted in compliance with this subsection shall be submitted electronically by the owner, operator, or the duly authorized representative of the small MS4 to the department in compliance with this section and 40 CFR Part 3 (including, in all cases, 40 CFR Part 3 Subpart D), 9VAC25-870-370, and Part XI (9VAC25-31-950 et seq.) of the Virginia Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (VPDES) Permit Regulation. Part XI of 9VAC25-31 is not intended to undo existing requirements for electronic reporting. Prior to this date, and independent of Part XI of 9VAC25-31, the owner, operator, or the duly authorized representative of the small MS4 may be required to report electronically if specified by a particular permit. Your report must include:

(1) The status of compliance with state permit conditions, an assessment of the appropriateness of your identified best management practices and progress towards achieving your identified measurable goals for each of the minimum control measures;

(2) Results of information collected and analyzed, including monitoring data, if any, during the reporting period;

(3) A summary of the stormwater activities you plan to undertake during the next reporting cycle;

(4) A change in any identified best management practices or measurable goals for any of the minimum control measures; and

(5) Notice that you are relying on another governmental entity to satisfy some of your state permit obligations (if applicable).

E. As an operator of a regulated small MS4, may I share the responsibility to implement the minimum control measures with other entities?

1. You may rely on another entity to satisfy your state permit obligations to implement a minimum control measure if:

a. The other entity, in fact, implements the control measure;

b. The particular control measure, or component thereof, is at least as stringent as the corresponding state permit requirement; and

c. The other entity agrees to implement the control measure on your behalf. In the reports you must submit under subdivision D 7 c of this section, you must also specify that you rely on another entity to satisfy some of your state permit obligations. If you are relying on another governmental entity regulated under the state permit program to satisfy all of your state permit obligations, including your obligation to file periodic reports required by subdivision D 7 c of this section, you must note that fact in your registration statement, but you are not required to file the periodic reports. You remain responsible for compliance with your state permit obligations if the other entity fails to implement the control measure (or component thereof). Therefore, the board encourages you to enter into a legally binding agreement with that entity if you want to minimize any uncertainty about compliance with your state permit.

2. In some cases, the board may recognize, either in your individual permit or in a general permit, that another governmental entity is responsible under a state permit for implementing one or more of the minimum control measures for your small MS4. Where the board does so, you are not required to include such minimum control measure(s) in your stormwater management program. Your state permit may be reopened and modified to include the requirement to implement a minimum control measure if the entity fails to implement it.

F. As an operator of a regulated small MS4, what happens if I don't comply with the application or state permit requirements in subsections C through E of this section?

State permits are enforceable under the Clean Water Act and the Virginia Stormwater Management Act. Violators may be subject to the enforcement actions and penalties described in Clean Water Act §§ 309(b), (c), and (g) and 505 or under §§ 62.1-44.15:39 through 62.1-44.15:48 of the Code of Virginia. Compliance with a state permit issued pursuant to § 402 of the Clean Water Act is deemed compliance, for purposes of §§ 309 and 505, with §§ 301, 302, 306, 307, and 403, except any standard imposed under § 307 for toxic pollutants injurious to human health. If you are covered as a state co-permittee under an individual permit or under a general permit by means of a joint registration statement, you remain subject to the enforcement actions and penalties for the failure to comply with the terms of the state permit in your jurisdiction except as set forth in subdivision E 2 of this section.

G. Will the small MS4 stormwater program regulations at subsections B through F of this section change in the future?

EPA intends to conduct an enhanced research effort and compile a comprehensive evaluation of the NPDES MS4 stormwater program. The board will reevaluate the regulations based on data from the EPA NPDES MS4 stormwater program, from research on receiving water impacts from stormwater, and the effectiveness of best management practices (BMPs), as well as other relevant information sources.

Statutory Authority

§ 62.1-44.15 of the Code of Virginia; § 402 of the Clean Water Act; 40 CFR Parts 122, 123, 124, 403, and 503.

Historical Notes

Former 4VAC50-60-400 derived from Volume 21, Issue 03, eff. January 29, 2005; amended, Volume 29, Issue 04, eff. November 21, 2012; amended and renumbered, Virginia Register Volume 30, Issue 02, eff. October 23, 2013; Volume 33, Issue 22, eff. July 26, 2017.

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