Administrative Code

Virginia Administrative Code
9/23/2021

Chapter 600. Regulations Pertaining to Food for Human Consumption

2VAC5-600-5. Petitions.

The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services will receive, consider, and respond to petitions by any interested person at any time with respect to reconsideration or revision of this regulation.

Statutory Authority

§ 3.2-5101 of the Code of Virginia.

Historical Notes

Derived from Virginia Register Volume 17, Issue 9, eff. December 14, 2000.

2VAC5-600-10. Adoption by reference.

A. Regulations from Title 21, Chapter 1, Subchapter A, Code of Federal Regulations. The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services hereby adopts the following provisions of Chapter 1 of Title 21, Subchapter A of the Code of Federal Regulations (Rev. April 1, 2019) as regulations applicable in the enforcement of the Virginia Food Act by reference:

Part 73, Listing of color additives exempt from certification, Subpart A - Foods.

Part 74, Listing of color additives subject to certification, Subpart A - Foods.

Part 81, General specifications and general restrictions for provisional color additives for use in foods, drugs and cosmetics.

Part 82, Listing of certified provisionally listed colors and specifications, Subpart B—Foods, Drugs and Cosmetics.

B. Regulations from Title 21, Chapter 1, Subchapter B, Code of Federal Regulations. The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services hereby adopts the following provisions of Chapter 1 of Title 21, Subchapter B of the Code of Federal Regulations (Rev. April 1, 2019) as regulations applicable in the enforcement of the Virginia Food Act by reference:

Part 100, General.

Part 101, Food labeling.

Part 102, Common or usual name for nonstandardized foods.

Part 104, Nutritional quality guidelines for foods.

Part 105, Foods for special dietary use.

Part 109, Unavoidable contaminants in food for human consumption and food-packaging material.

Part 111, Current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, packaging, labeling, or holding operations for dietary supplements.

Part 113, Thermally processed low-acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed containers.

Part 114, Acidified foods.

Part 117, Current good manufacturing practice, hazard analysis, and risk-based preventive controls for human food.

Part 120, Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems.

Part 123, Fish and fishery products.

Part 129, Processing and bottling of bottled drinking water.

Part 133, Cheeses and related cheese products.

Part 136, Bakery products.

Part 137, Cereal flours and related products.

Part 139, Macaroni and noodle products.

Part 145, Canned fruits.

Part 146, Canned fruit juices.

Part 150, Fruit butters, jellies, preserves, and related products.

Part 152, Fruit pies.

Part 155, Canned vegetables.

Part 156, Vegetable juices.

Part 158, Frozen vegetables.

Part 160, Eggs and egg products.

Part 161, Fish and shellfish.

Part 163, Cacao products.

Part 164, Tree nut and peanut products.

Part 165, Beverages.

Part 166, Margarine.

Part 168, Sweeteners and table sirups.

Part 169, Food dressings and flavorings.

§ 170.19, Pesticide chemicals in processed foods.

Part 172, Food additives permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption.

Part 173, Secondary direct food additives permitted in food for human consumption.

Part 174, Indirect food additives: General.

Part 175, Indirect food additives: Adhesives and components of coatings.

Part 176, Indirect food additives: Paper and paperboard components.

Part 177, Indirect food additives: Polymers.

Part 178, Indirect food additives: Adjuvants, production aids, and sanitizers.

Part 179, Irradiation in the production, processing and handling of food.

Part 180, Food additives permitted in food or in contact with food on an interim basis pending additional study, Subpart B—Specific requirements for certain food additives.

Part 181, Prior-sanctioned food ingredients.

Part 182, Substances generally recognized as safe.

Part 184, Direct food substances affirmed as generally recognized as safe.

Part 186, Indirect food substances affirmed as generally recognized as safe.

Part 189, Substances prohibited from use in human food.

C. Regulations from Title 21, Chapter 1, Subchapter L, Code of Federal Regulations. The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services hereby adopts the following provisions of Chapter 1 of Title 21, Subchapter L of the Code of Federal Regulations (Rev. April 1, 2019) as regulations applicable in the enforcement of the Virginia Food Act by reference:

§ 1240.61, Mandatory pasteurization for all milk and milk products in final package form intended for direct human consumption.

D. Regulations from Title 40, Chapter 1, Subchapter E, Code of Federal Regulations. The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services hereby adopts the following provisions of Chapter 1 of Title 40, Subchapter E of the Code of Federal Regulations (Rev. April 1, 2019) as regulations applicable to the enforcement of the Virginia Food Act by reference:

Part 180, Tolerances and exemptions for pesticide chemical residues in food.

Statutory Authority

§§ 3.2-5101 and 3.2-5121 of the Code of Virginia.

Historical Notes

Derived from VR115‑05‑13 § 1, eff. October 28, 1991; amended, Virginia Register Volume 8, Issue 7, eff. December 5, 1991; Volume 16, Issue 20, eff. May 31, 2000; Volume 17, Issue 9, eff. December 14, 2001; Volume 27, Issue 14, eff. February 22, 2011; Volume 36, Issue 9, eff. December 2, 2019.

Website addresses provided in the Virginia Administrative Code to documents incorporated by reference are for the reader's convenience only, may not necessarily be active or current, and should not be relied upon. To ensure the information incorporated by reference is accurate, the reader is encouraged to use the source document described in the regulation.

As a service to the public, the Virginia Administrative Code is provided online by the Virginia General Assembly. We are unable to answer legal questions or respond to requests for legal advice, including application of law to specific fact. To understand and protect your legal rights, you should consult an attorney.