Code of Virginia

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Code of Virginia
Title 3.2. Agriculture, Animal Care, and Food
Chapter 2. Preservation of Farm and Forest Lands
12/7/2022

Article 2. Protection of Farm and Forest Lands.

§ 3.2-204. Review of capital projects.

In preparing its report on each major state project, as required in Article 2 (§ 10.1-1188 et seq.) of Chapter 11.1 of Title 10.1, each state agency shall demonstrate that it has considered the impact that project would have on farm and forest lands as required in § 3.2-205, and has adequately considered alternatives and mitigating measures. The Department of Environmental Quality, in conducting its review of each major state project, shall ensure that such consideration has been demonstrated and shall incorporate its evaluation of the effects that project would have on farm and forest lands in its comments to the Governor. The procedures for review of highway and road construction projects established in accordance with subsection B of § 10.1-1188 shall include provisions requiring that the factors listed in § 3.2-205 are considered as part of the review of each project.

1981, c. 635, § 3.1-18.8; 1982, c. 417; 2000, cc. 22, 778; 2008, c. 860.

§ 3.2-205. Characteristics to be considered in evaluating impacts on farm and forest lands.

A. In preparing environmental impact reports in accordance with § 3.2-204, state agencies shall consider the impact of the major state project on all farm and forest lands that:

1. Have soil classified as capability class I, II, III, or IV;

2. Have an exceptional combination of physical characteristics for the production of food, feed, fiber, forest products, forage, oilseed, and other agricultural crops with minimum inputs of fuel, fertilizer, pesticides, and labor, and without intolerable soil erosion;

3. Are valuable for production of specific high-value food and fiber crops, such as fruits, vegetables, and nursery crops and have a special combination of soil quality, location, growing season, and moisture supply needed to economically produce sustained high quality or high yields of such crops when treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods;

4. Are of statewide or local importance for the production of food, feed, fiber, forest products, forage, or oilseed crops;

5. Have been recognized under a state program such as the Clean Water Farm Award or the Century Farm Program;

6. Are part of an agricultural or forestal district or are participating in a use value assessment and taxation program for real estate devoted to agricultural, horticultural, or forest use in accordance with the provisions of Article 4 (§ 58.1-3229 et seq.) of Chapter 32 of Title 58.1; or

7. Make a significant contribution to the local economy or the rural character of the area where the land is located.

B. The governing body of each locality, with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, may designate the important farmlands within its jurisdiction. In designating important farmlands the governing body shall demonstrate that adequate provision has been made for nonagricultural uses within its jurisdiction.

C. As used in this chapter, "farmland" includes all land defined as follows:

"Important farmland," other than prime or unique farmland, is land that is of statewide or local importance for the production of food, feed, fiber, forage, nursery, oilseed, or other agricultural crops, as determined by the appropriate state agency or local government agency, and that the U.S. Department of Agriculture determines should be considered as farmland for the purposes of this chapter;

"Prime farmland" is land that has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for producing food, feed, fiber, forage, oilseed, nursery, and other agricultural crops with minimum inputs of fuel, fertilizer, pesticides, and labor, and without intolerable soil erosion. Prime farmland includes land that possesses the above characteristics but is being used currently to produce livestock and timber. It does not include land already in or committed to urban development or water storage; and

"Unique farmland" is land other than prime farmland that is used for production of specific high-value food and fiber crops, as determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It has the special combination of soil quality, location, growing season, and moisture supply needed to economically produce sustained high quality or high yields of specific crops when treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods.

1981, c. 635, § 3.1-18.5; 1982, c. 417; 2000, cc. 22, 778; 2003, c. 384; 2008, c. 860.

§ 3.2-206. Repealed.

Repealed by Acts 2017, c. 5, cl. 2.