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Virginia Administrative Code
Title 9. Environment
Agency 5. State Air Pollution Control Board
Chapter 80. Permits for Stationary Sources
11/13/2019

9VAC5-80-1615. Definitions.

A. As used in this article, all words or terms not defined herein shall have the meanings given them in 9VAC5-10 (General Definitions), unless otherwise required by context.

B. For the purpose of this article, 9VAC5-50-280, and applying this article in the context of the Regulations for the Control and Abatement of Air Pollution and related uses, the words or terms shall have the meanings given them in subsection C of this section:

C. Terms defined.

"Actual emissions" means the actual rate of emissions of a regulated NSR pollutant from an emissions unit, as determined in accordance with subdivisions a, b, and c of this definition, except that this definition shall not apply for calculating whether a significant emissions increase has occurred, or for establishing a PAL under 9VAC5-80-1865. Instead, the definitions of "projected actual emissions" and "baseline actual emissions" shall apply for those purposes.

a. In general, actual emissions as of a particular date shall equal the average rate, in tons per year, at which the unit actually emitted the pollutant during a consecutive 24-month period that precedes the particular date and that is representative of normal source operation. The board will allow the use of a different time period upon a determination that it is more representative of normal source operation. Actual emissions shall be calculated using the unit's actual operating hours, production rates, and types of materials processed, stored, or combusted during the selected time period.

b. The board may presume that source-specific allowable emissions for the unit are equivalent to the actual emissions of the unit.

c. For any emissions unit that has not begun normal operations on the particular date, actual emissions shall equal the potential to emit of the unit on that date.

"Actuals PAL for a major stationary source" means a PAL based on the baseline actual emissions of all emissions units at the source that emit or have the potential to emit the PAL pollutant.

"Administrator" means the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or an authorized representative.

"Adverse impact on visibility" means visibility impairment that interferes with the management, protection, preservation or enjoyment of the visitor's visual experience of the federal class I area. This determination shall be made on a case-by-case basis taking into account the geographic extent, intensity, duration, frequency and time of visibility impairment, and how these factors correlate with (i) times of visitor use of the federal class I areas, and (ii) the frequency and timing of natural conditions that reduce visibility.

"Allowable emissions" means the emissions rate of a stationary source calculated using the maximum rated capacity of the source (unless the source is subject to federally and state enforceable limits that restrict the operating rate, hours of operation, or both) and the most stringent of the following:

a. The applicable standards as set forth in 40 CFR Parts 60, 61, and 63;

b. The applicable implementation plan emissions limitation including those with a future compliance date; or

c. The emissions limit specified as a federally and state enforceable permit condition, including those with a future compliance date.

For the purposes of actuals PALs, "allowable emissions" shall also be calculated considering any emission limitations that are enforceable as a practical matter on the emissions unit's potential to emit.

"Applicable federal requirement" means all of, but not limited to, the following as they apply to emissions units in a source subject to this article (including requirements that have been promulgated or approved by the administrator through rulemaking at the time of permit issuance but have future-effective compliance dates):

a. Any standard or other requirement provided for in an implementation plan established pursuant to § 110 or 111(d) of the federal Clean Air Act, including any source-specific provisions such as consent agreements or orders.

b. Any limit or condition in any construction permit issued under the new source review program or in any operating permit issued pursuant to the state operating permit program.

c. Any emission standard, alternative emission standard, alternative emission limitation, equivalent emission limitation or other requirement established pursuant to § 112 or 129 of the federal Clean Air Act as amended in 1990.

d. Any new source performance standard or other requirement established pursuant to § 111 of the federal Clean Air Act, and any emission standard or other requirement established pursuant to § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act before it was amended in 1990.

e. Any limitations and conditions or other requirement in a Virginia regulation or program that has been approved by EPA under subpart E of 40 CFR Part 63 for the purposes of implementing and enforcing § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act.

f. Any requirement concerning accident prevention under § 112(r)(7) of the federal Clean Air Act.

g. Any compliance monitoring requirements established pursuant to either § 504(b) or 114(a)(3) of the federal Clean Air Act.

h. Any standard or other requirement for consumer and commercial products under § 183(e) of the federal Clean Air Act.

i. Any standard or other requirement for tank vessels under § 183(f) of the federal Clean Air Act.

j. Any standard or other requirement in 40 CFR Part 55 to control air pollution from outer continental shelf sources.

k. Any standard or other requirement of the regulations promulgated to protect stratospheric ozone under Title VI of the federal Clean Air Act unless the administrator has determined that such requirements need not be contained in a permit issued under this article.

l. With regard to temporary sources subject to 9VAC5-80-130, (i) any ambient air quality standard, except applicable state requirements, and (ii) requirements regarding increments or visibility as provided in this article.

"Baseline actual emissions" means the rate of emissions, in tons per year, of a regulated NSR pollutant, as determined in accordance with the following:

a. For any existing electric utility steam generating unit, baseline actual emissions means the average rate, in tons per year, at which the unit actually emitted the pollutant during any consecutive 24-month period selected by the owner within the five-year period immediately preceding when the owner begins actual construction of the project. The board will allow the use of a different time period upon a determination that it is more representative of normal source operation.

(1) The average rate shall include fugitive emissions to the extent quantifiable, and emissions associated with startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions.

(2) The average rate shall be adjusted downward to exclude any noncompliant emissions that occurred while the source was operating above any emission limitation that was legally enforceable during the consecutive 24-month period.

(3) For a regulated NSR pollutant, when a project involves multiple emissions units, only one consecutive 24-month period shall be used to determine the baseline actual emissions for the emissions units being changed. A different consecutive 24-month period may be used for each regulated NSR pollutant.

(4) The average rate shall not be based on any consecutive 24-month period for which there is inadequate information for determining annual emissions, in tons per year, and for adjusting this amount if required by subdivision a (2) of this definition.

b. For an existing emissions unit (other than an electric utility steam generating unit), baseline actual emissions means the average rate, in tons per year, at which the emissions unit actually emitted the pollutant during any consecutive 24-month period selected by the owner within the 10-year period immediately preceding either the date the owner begins actual construction of the project, or the date a complete permit application is received by the board for a permit required under this article, whichever is earlier, except that the 10-year period shall not include any period earlier than November 15, 1990.

(1) The average rate shall include fugitive emissions to the extent quantifiable, and emissions associated with startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions.

(2) The average rate shall be adjusted downward to exclude any noncompliant emissions that occurred while the source was operating above any emission limitation that was legally enforceable during the consecutive 24-month period.

(3) The average rate shall be adjusted downward to exclude any emissions that would have exceeded an emission limitation with which the major stationary source must currently comply, had such major stationary source been required to comply with such limitations during the consecutive 24-month period. However, if an emission limitation is part of a maximum achievable control technology standard that the administrator proposed or promulgated under 40 CFR Part 63, the baseline actual emissions need only be adjusted if the board has taken credit for such emissions reductions in an attainment demonstration or maintenance plan consistent with the requirements of 9VAC5-80-2120 K.

(4) For a regulated NSR pollutant, when a project involves multiple emissions units, only one consecutive 24-month period shall be used to determine the baseline actual emissions for all the emissions units being changed. A different consecutive 24-month period may be used for each regulated NSR pollutant.

(5) The average rate shall not be based on any consecutive 24-month period for which there is inadequate information for determining annual emissions, in tons per year, and for adjusting this amount if required by subdivisions b (2) and b (3) of this definition.

c. For a new emissions unit, the baseline actual emissions for purposes of determining the emissions increase that will result from the initial construction and operation of such unit shall equal zero; and thereafter, for all other purposes, shall equal the unit's potential to emit.

d. For a PAL for a stationary source, the baseline actual emissions shall be calculated for existing electric utility steam generating units in accordance with the procedures contained in subdivision a of this definition, for other existing emissions units in accordance with the procedures contained in subdivision b of this definition, and for a new emissions unit in accordance with the procedures contained in subdivision c of this subsection.

"Baseline area":

a. Means any intrastate area (and every part thereof) designated as attainment or unclassifiable under § 107(d)(1)(A)(ii) or (iii) of the federal Clean Air Act in which the major source or major modification establishing the minor source baseline date would construct or would have an air quality impact for the pollutant for which the baseline date is established, as follows: (i) for SO2, NO2, or PM10, equal to or greater than 1 µg/m3 (annual average); or (ii) for PM2.5, equal to or greater than 0.3 µg/m3 (annual average).

b. Area redesignations under § 107(d)(1)(A)(ii) or (iii) of the federal Clean Air Act cannot intersect or be smaller than the area of impact of any major stationary source or major modification that:

(1) Establishes a minor source baseline date; or

(2) Is subject to this article or 40 CFR 52.21 and would be constructed in the same state as the state proposing the redesignation.

c. Any baseline area established originally for the TSP increments shall remain in effect and shall apply for purposes of determining the amount of available PM10 increments, except that such baseline area shall not remain in effect if the board rescinds the corresponding minor source baseline date in accordance with subdivision d of the definition of "baseline date."

"Baseline concentration"

a. Means that ambient concentration level that exists in the baseline area at the time of the applicable minor source baseline date. A baseline concentration is determined for each pollutant for which a minor source baseline date is established and shall include:

(1) The actual emissions representative of sources in existence on the applicable minor source baseline date, except as provided in subdivision b of this definition; and

(2) The allowable emissions of major stationary sources that commenced construction before the major source baseline date, but were not in operation by the applicable minor source baseline date.

b. The following will not be included in the baseline concentration and will affect the applicable maximum allowable increase(s):

(1) Actual emissions from any major stationary source on which construction commenced after the major source baseline date; and

(2) Actual emissions increases and decreases at any stationary source occurring after the minor source baseline date.

"Baseline date"

a. "Major source baseline date" means:

(1) In the case of PM10 and sulfur dioxide, January 6, 1975;

(2) In the case of nitrogen dioxide, February 8, 1988; and

(3) In the case of PM2.5, October 20, 2010.

b. "Minor source baseline date" means the earliest date after the trigger date on which a major stationary source or a major modification subject to this article submits a complete application under this article. The trigger date is:

(1) In the case of PM10 and sulfur dioxide, August 7, 1977;

(2) In the case of nitrogen dioxide, February 8, 1988; and

(3) In the case of PM2.5, October 20, 2011.

c. The baseline date is established for each pollutant for which increments or other equivalent measures have been established if:

(1) The area in which the proposed source or modification would construct is designated as attainment or unclassifiable under § 107(d)(1)(A)(ii) or (iii) of the federal Clean Air Act for the pollutant on the date of its complete application under this article or 40 CFR 52.21; and

(2) In the case of a major stationary source, the pollutant would be emitted in significant amounts, or, in the case of a major modification, there would be a significant net emissions increase of the pollutant.

d. Any minor source baseline date established originally for the TSP increments shall remain in effect and shall apply for purposes of determining the amount of available PM10 increments, except that the board may rescind any such minor source baseline date where it can be shown, to the satisfaction of the board, that the emissions increase from the major stationary source, or the net emissions increase from the major modification, responsible for triggering that date did not result in a significant amount of PM10 emissions.

"Begin actual construction" means, in general, initiation of physical on-site construction activities on an emissions unit that are of a permanent nature. Such activities include, but are not limited to, installation of building supports and foundations, laying of underground pipework, and construction of permanent storage structures. With respect to a change in method of operation, this term refers to those on-site activities other than preparatory activities that mark the initiation of the change.

"Best available control technology" or "BACT" means an emissions limitation (including a visible emissions standard) based on the maximum degree of reduction for each regulated NSR pollutant that would be emitted from any proposed major stationary source or major modification that the board, on a case-by-case basis, taking into account energy, environmental, and economic impacts and other costs, determines is achievable for such source or modification through application of production processes or available methods, systems, and techniques, including fuel cleaning or treatment or innovative fuel combustion techniques for control of such pollutant. In no event shall application of best available control technology result in emissions of any pollutant that would exceed the emissions allowed by any applicable standard under 40 CFR Parts 60, 61, and 63. If the board determines that technological or economic limitations on the application of measurement methodology to a particular emissions unit would make the imposition of an emissions standard infeasible, a design, equipment, work practice, operational standard, or combination thereof, may be prescribed instead to satisfy the requirement for the application of best available control technology. Such standard shall, to the degree possible, set forth the emissions reduction achievable by implementation of such design, equipment, work practice or operation, and shall provide for compliance by means that achieve equivalent results.

"Building, structure, facility or installation" means all of the pollutant-emitting activities that belong to the same industrial grouping, are located on one or more contiguous or adjacent properties, and are under the control of the same person (or persons under common control) except the activities of any vessel. Pollutant-emitting activities shall be considered as part of the same industrial grouping if they belong to the same "Major Group" (i.e., that have the same first two-digit code) as described in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (see 9VAC5-20-21).

"Clean coal technology" means any technology, including technologies applied at the precombustion, combustion, or post combustion stage, at a new or existing facility that will achieve significant reductions in air emissions of sulfur dioxide or oxides of nitrogen associated with the utilization of coal in the generation of electricity, or process steam that was not in widespread use as of November 15, 1990.

"Clean coal technology demonstration project" means a project using funds appropriated under the heading "Department of Energy-Clean Coal Technology," up to a total amount of $2,500,000,000 for commercial demonstration of clean coal technology, or similar projects funded through appropriations for EPA. The federal contribution for a qualifying project shall be at least 20% of the total cost of the demonstration project.

"Commence" as applied to construction of a major stationary source or major modification, means that the owner has all necessary preconstruction approvals or permits and either has:

a. Begun, or caused to begin, a continuous program of actual on-site construction of the source, to be completed within a reasonable time; or

b. Entered into binding agreements or contractual obligations, that cannot be canceled or modified without substantial loss to the owner, to undertake a program of actual construction of the source, to be completed within a reasonable time.

"Complete" means, in reference to an application for a permit, that the application contains all of the information necessary for processing the application and the provisions of § 10.1-1321.1 of the Virginia Air Pollution Control Law have been met. Designating an application complete for the purposes of permit processing does not preclude the board from requesting or accepting any additional information.

"Construction" means any physical change or change in the method of operation (including fabrication, erection, installation, demolition, or modification of an emissions unit) that would result in a change in emissions.

"Continuous emissions monitoring system" or "CEMS" means all of the equipment that may be required to meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this article, to sample, condition (if applicable), analyze, and provide a record of emissions on a continuous basis.

"Continuous emissions rate monitoring system" or "CERMS" means the total equipment required for the determination and recording of the pollutant mass emissions rate (in terms of mass per unit of time).

"Continuous parameter monitoring system" or "CPMS" means all of the equipment necessary to meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this article, to monitor process and control device operational parameters (for example, control device secondary voltages and electric currents) and other information (for example, gas flow rate, O2 or CO2 concentrations), and to record average operational parameter value(s) on a continuous basis.

"Electric utility steam generating unit" means any steam electric generating unit that is constructed for the purpose of supplying more than one-third of its potential electric output capacity and more than 25 MW electrical output to any utility power distribution system for sale. Any steam supplied to a steam distribution system for the purpose of providing steam to a steam-electric generator that would produce electrical energy for sale is also considered in determining the electrical energy output capacity of the affected facility.

"Emissions unit" means any part of a stationary source that emits or would have the potential to emit any regulated NSR pollutant and includes an electric utility steam generating unit. For purposes of this definition, there are two types of emissions units: (i) a new emissions unit is any emissions unit that is (or will be) newly constructed and that has existed for less than two years from the date such emissions unit first operated; and (ii) an existing emissions unit is any emissions unit that is not a new emissions unit. A replacement unit is an existing emissions unit.

"Enforceable as a practical matter" means that the permit contains emission limitations that are enforceable by the board or the department and meet the following criteria:

a. Are permanent;

b. Contain a legal obligation for the owner to adhere to the terms and conditions;

c. Do not allow a relaxation of a requirement of the implementation plan;

d. Are technically accurate and quantifiable;

e. Include averaging times or other provisions that allow at least monthly (or a shorter period if necessary to be consistent with the implementation plan) checks on compliance. This may include, but not be limited to, the following: compliance with annual limits on a rolling basis, monthly or shorter limits, and other provisions consistent with this article and other regulations of the board; and

f. Require a level of recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring sufficient to demonstrate compliance.

"Federal land manager" means, with respect to any lands in the United States, the secretary of the department with authority over such lands.

"Federally enforceable" means all limitations and conditions that are enforceable by the administrator and citizens under the federal Clean Air Act or that are enforceable under other statutes administered by the administrator. Federally enforceable limitations and conditions include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Emission standards, alternative emission standards, alternative emission limitations, and equivalent emission limitations established pursuant to § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act as amended in 1990.

b. New source performance standards established pursuant to § 111 of the federal Clean Air Act, and emission standards established pursuant to § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act before it was amended in 1990.

c. All terms and conditions (unless expressly designated as not federally enforceable) in a federal operating permit, including any provisions that limit a source's potential to emit.

d. Limitations and conditions that are part of an implementation plan established pursuant to § 110, 111(d) or 129 of the federal Clean Air Act.

e. Limitations and conditions (unless expressly designated as not federally enforceable) that are part of a federal construction permit issued under 40 CFR 52.21 or a new source review permit issued under regulations approved by the EPA into the implementation plan.

f. Limitations and conditions (unless expressly designated as not federally enforceable) that are part of a state operating permit where the permit and the permit program pursuant to which it was issued meet all of the following criteria:

(1) The operating permit program has been approved by the EPA into the implementation plan under § 110 of the federal Clean Air Act;

(2) The operating permit program imposes a legal obligation that operating permit holders adhere to the terms and limitations of such permits and provides that permits that do not conform to the operating permit program requirements and the requirements of EPA's underlying regulations may be deemed not "federally enforceable" by EPA;

(3) The operating permit program requires that all emission limitations, controls, and other requirements imposed by such permits will be at least as stringent as any other applicable limitations and requirements contained in the implementation plan or enforceable under the implementation plan, and that the program may not issue permits that waive, or make less stringent, any limitations or requirements contained in or issued pursuant to the implementation plan, or that are otherwise "federally enforceable";

(4) The limitations, controls, and requirements in the permit in question are permanent, quantifiable, and otherwise enforceable as a practical matter; and

(5) The permit in question was issued only after adequate and timely notice and opportunity for comment by the EPA and the public.

g. Limitations and conditions in a regulation of the board or program that has been approved by the EPA under subpart E of 40 CFR Part 63 for the purposes of implementing and enforcing § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act.

h. Individual consent agreements that the EPA has legal authority to create.

"Federal operating permit" means a permit issued under the federal operating permit program.

"Federal operating permit program" means an operating permit system (i) for issuing terms and conditions for major stationary sources, (ii) established to implement the requirements of Title V of the federal Clean Air Act and associated regulations, and (iii) codified in Article 1 (9VAC5-80-50 et seq.), Article 2 (9VAC5-80-310 et seq.), Article 3 (9VAC5-80-360 et seq.), and Article 4 (9VAC5-80-710 et seq.) of this part.

"Fugitive emissions" means those emissions that could not reasonably pass through a stack, chimney, vent, or other functionally equivalent opening.

"High terrain" means any area having an elevation 900 feet or more above the base of the stack of a source.

"Indian governing body" means the governing body of any tribe, band, or group of Indians subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and recognized by the United States as possessing power of self-government.

"Indian reservation" means any federally recognized reservation established by treaty, agreement, executive order, or act of Congress.

"Innovative control technology" means any system of air pollution control that has not been adequately demonstrated in practice, but would have substantial likelihood of achieving greater continuous emissions reduction than any control system in current practice or of achieving at least comparable reductions at lower cost in terms of energy, economics, or nonair quality environmental impacts.

"Lowest achievable emission rate" or "LAER" is as defined in 9VAC5-80-2010 C.

"Locality particularly affected" means any locality that bears any identified disproportionate material air quality impact that would not be experienced by other localities.

"Low terrain" means any area other than high terrain.

"Major emissions unit" means (i) any emissions unit that emits or has the potential to emit 100 tons per year or more of the PAL pollutant in an attainment area; or (ii) any emissions unit that emits or has the potential to emit the PAL pollutant for nonattainment areas in an amount that is equal to or greater than the major source threshold for the PAL pollutant in subdivision a (1) of the definition of "major stationary source " in 9VAC5-80-2010 C.

"Major modification"

a. Means any physical change in or change in the method of operation of a major stationary source that would result in a significant emissions increase of a regulated NSR pollutant, and a significant net emissions increase of that pollutant from the major stationary source.

b. Any significant emissions increase from any emissions units or net emissions increase at a major stationary source that is significant for volatile organic compounds or NOX shall be considered significant for ozone.

c. A physical change or change in the method of operation shall not include the following:

(1) Routine maintenance, repair and replacement.

(2) Use of an alternative fuel or raw material by reason of an order under § 2 (a) and (b) of the Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act of 1974 (or any superseding legislation) or by reason of a natural gas curtailment plant pursuant to the federal Power Act.

(3) Use of an alternative fuel by reason of any order or rule under § 125 of the federal Clean Air Act.

(4) Use of an alternative fuel at a steam generating unit to the extent that the fuel is generated from municipal solid waste.

(5) Use of an alternative fuel or raw material by a stationary source that:

(a) The source was capable of accommodating before January 6, 1975, unless such change would be prohibited under any federally and state enforceable permit condition that was established after January 6, 1975, pursuant to 40 CFR 52.21 or this chapter; or

(b) The source is approved to use under any permit issued under 40 CFR 52.21 or this chapter.

(6) An increase in the hours of operation or in the production rate, unless such change is prohibited under any federally and state enforceable permit condition that was established after January 6, 1975, pursuant to 40 CFR 52.21 or this chapter.

(7) Any change in ownership at a stationary source.

(8) The installation, operation, cessation, or removal of a temporary clean coal technology demonstration project, provided that the project complies with:

(a) The applicable implementation plan; and

(b) Other requirements necessary to attain and maintain the ambient air quality standards during the project and after it is terminated.

(9) The installation or operation of a permanent clean coal technology demonstration project that constitutes repowering, provided that the project does not result in an increase in the potential to emit of any regulated pollutant emitted by the unit. This exemption shall apply on a pollutant-by-pollutant basis.

(10) The reactivation of a very clean coal-fired electric utility steam generating unit.

d. This definition shall not apply with respect to a particular regulated NSR pollutant when the major stationary source is complying with the requirements under 9VAC5-80-1865 for a PAL for that pollutant. Instead, the definition of "PAL major modification" shall apply.

"Major new source review (NSR) permit" means a permit issued under the major new source review program.

"Major new source review (major NSR) program" means a preconstruction review and permit program (i) for new major stationary sources or major modifications (physical changes or changes in the method of operation), (ii) established to implement the requirements of §§ 112, 165 and 173 of the federal Clean Air Act and associated regulations, and (iii) codified in Article 7 (9VAC5-80-1400 et seq.), Article 8 (9VAC5-80-1605 et seq.) and Article 9 (9VAC5-80-2000 et seq.) of this part.

"Major stationary source"

a. Means:

(1) Any of the following stationary sources of air pollutants that emits, or has the potential to emit, 100 tons per year or more of any regulated NSR pollutant:

(a) Fossil fuel-fired steam electric plants of more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input.

(b) Coal cleaning plants (with thermal dryers).

(c) Kraft pulp mills.

(d) Portland cement plants.

(e) Primary zinc smelters.

(f) Iron and steel mill plants.

(g) Primary aluminum ore reduction plants.

(h) Primary copper smelters.

(i) Municipal incinerators capable of charging more than 250 tons of refuse per day.

(j) Hydrofluoric acid plants.

(k) Sulfuric acid plants.

(l) Nitric acid plants.

(m) Petroleum refineries.

(n) Lime plants.

(o) Phosphate rock processing plants.

(p) Coke oven batteries.

(q) Sulfur recovery plants.

(r) Carbon black plants (furnace process).

(s) Primary lead smelters.

(t) Fuel conversion plants.

(u) Sintering plants.

(v) Secondary metal production plants.

(w) Chemical process plants (which does not include ethanol production facilities that produce ethanol by natural fermentation included in NAICS codes 325193 or 312140).

(x) Fossil fuel boilers (or combination of them) totaling more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input.

(y) Petroleum storage and transfer units with a total storage capacity exceeding 300,000 barrels.

(z) Taconite ore processing plants.

(aa) Glass fiber processing plants.

(bb) Charcoal production plants;

(2) Notwithstanding the stationary source size specified in subdivision a (1) of this definition, any stationary source that emits, or has the potential to emit, 250 tons per year or more of a regulated NSR pollutant; or

(3) Any physical change that would occur at a stationary source not otherwise qualifying under subdivision a (1) or a (2) of this definition as a major stationary source, if the change would constitute a major stationary source by itself.

b. A major stationary source that is major for volatile organic compounds or NOX shall be considered major for ozone.

c. The fugitive emissions of a stationary source shall not be included in determining for any of the purposes of this article whether it is a major stationary source, unless the source belongs to one of the following categories of stationary sources:

(1) Coal cleaning plants (with thermal dryers).

(2) Kraft pulp mills.

(3) Portland cement plants.

(4) Primary zinc smelters.

(5) Iron and steel mills.

(6) Primary aluminum ore reduction plants.

(7) Primary copper smelters.

(8) Municipal incinerators capable of charging more than 250 tons of refuse per day.

(9) Hydrofluoric, sulfuric, or nitric acid plants.

(10) Petroleum refineries.

(11) Lime plants.

(12) Phosphate rock processing plants.

(13) Coke oven batteries.

(14) Sulfur recovery plants.

(15) Carbon black plants (furnace process).

(16) Primary lead smelters.

(17) Fuel conversion plants.

(18) Sintering plants.

(19) Secondary metal production plants.

(20) Chemical process plants (which shall not include ethanol production facilities that produce ethanol by natural fermentation included in NAICS codes 325193 or 312140).

(21) Fossil-fuel boilers (or combination of them) totaling more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input.

(22) Petroleum storage and transfer units with a total storage capacity exceeding 300,000 barrels.

(23) Taconite ore processing plants.

(24) Glass fiber processing plants.

(25) Charcoal production plants.

(26) Fossil fuel-fired steam electric plants of more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input.

(27) Any other stationary source category that, as of August 7, 1980, is being regulated under 40 CFR Parts 60 and 61.

"Minor new source review (NSR) permit" means a permit issued under the minor new source review program.

"Minor new source review (minor NSR) program" means a preconstruction review and permit program (i) for new stationary sources or modifications (physical changes or changes in the method of operation) that are not subject to review under the major new source review program, (ii) established to implement the requirements of §§ 110(a)(2)(C) and 112 of the federal Clean Air Act and associated regulations, and (iii) codified in Article 6 (9VAC5-80-1100 et seq.) of this part.

"Necessary preconstruction approvals or permits" means those permits required under NSR programs that are part of the applicable implementation plan.

"Net emissions increase" means:

a. With respect to any regulated NSR pollutant emitted by a major stationary source, the amount by which the sum of the following exceeds zero:

(1) The increase in emissions from a particular physical change or change in the method of operation at a stationary source as calculated pursuant to 9VAC5-80-1605 G; and

(2) Any other increases and decreases in actual emissions at the major stationary source that are contemporaneous with the particular change and are otherwise creditable. Baseline actual emissions for calculating increases and decreases under this subdivision shall be determined as provided in the definition of "baseline actual emissions," except that subdivisions a (3) and b (4) of that definition shall not apply.

b. An increase or decrease in actual emissions is contemporaneous with the increase from the particular change only if it occurs between:

(1) The date five years before construction on the particular change commences; and

(2) The date that the increase from the particular change occurs.

c. An increase or decrease in actual emissions is creditable only if (i) it occurs between the date five years before construction on the particular change commences and the date that the increase from the particular change occurs; and (ii) the board has not relied on it in issuing a permit for the source under this article (or the administrator under 40 CFR 52.21), which permit is in effect when the increase in actual emissions from the particular change occurs.

d. An increase or decrease in actual emissions of sulfur dioxide, particulate matter, or nitrogen oxides that occurs before the applicable minor source baseline date is creditable only if it is required to be considered in calculating the amount of maximum allowable increases remaining available.

e. An increase in actual emissions is creditable only to the extent that the new level of actual emissions exceeds the old level.

f. A decrease in actual emissions is creditable only to the extent that:

(1) The old level of actual emissions or the old level of allowable emissions, whichever is lower, exceeds the new level of actual emissions;

(2) It is enforceable as a practical matter at and after the time that actual construction on the particular change begins; and

(3) It has approximately the same qualitative significance for public health and welfare as that attributed to the increase from the particular change.

g. An increase that results from a physical change at a source occurs when the emissions unit on which construction occurred becomes operational and begins to emit a particular pollutant. Any replacement unit that requires shakedown becomes operational only after a reasonable shakedown period, not to exceed 180 days.

h. Subdivision a of the definition of "actual emissions" shall not apply for determining creditable increases and decreases.

"New source performance standard" or "NSPS" means the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regulations on Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources as promulgated in 40 CFR Part 60 and designated in 9VAC5-50-410.

"New source review (NSR) permit" means a permit issued under the new source review program.

"New source review (NSR) program" means a preconstruction review and permit program (i) for new stationary sources or modifications (physical changes or changes in the method of operation); (ii) established to implement the requirements of §§ 110(a)(2)(C), 112 (relating to permits for hazardous air pollutants), 165 (relating to permits in prevention of significant deterioration areas), and 173 (relating to permits in nonattainment areas) of the federal Clean Air Act and associated regulations; and (iii) codified in Article 6 (9VAC5-80-1100 et seq.), Article 7 (9VAC5-80-1400 et seq.), Article 8 (9VAC5-80-1605 et seq.) and Article 9 (9VAC5-80-2000 et seq.) of this part.

"Plantwide applicability limitation" or "PAL" means an emission limitation expressed in tons per year, for a pollutant at a major stationary source, that is enforceable as a practical matter and established sourcewide in accordance with 9VAC5-80-1865.

"PAL effective date" generally means the date of issuance of the PAL permit. However, the PAL effective date for an increased PAL is the date any emissions unit that is part of the PAL major modification becomes operational and begins to emit the PAL pollutant.

"PAL effective period" means the period beginning with the PAL effective date and ending 10 years later.

"PAL major modification" means, notwithstanding the definitions for major modification and net emissions increase, any physical change in or change in the method of operation of the PAL source that causes it to emit the PAL pollutant at a level equal to or greater than the PAL.

"PAL permit" means the state operating permit issued by the board that establishes a PAL for a major stationary source.

"PAL pollutant" means the pollutant for which a PAL is established at a major stationary source.

"Potential to emit" means the maximum capacity of a stationary source to emit a pollutant under its physical and operational design. Any physical or operational limitation on the capacity of the source to emit a pollutant, including air pollution control equipment, and restrictions on hours of operation or on the type or amount of material combusted, stored, or processed, shall be treated as part of its design if the limitation or the effect it would have on emissions is federally and state enforceable. Secondary emissions do not count in determining the potential to emit of a stationary source. For the purposes of actuals PALs, any physical or operational limitation on the capacity of the source to emit a pollutant, including air pollution control equipment, and restrictions on hours of operation or on the type or amount of material combusted, stored, or processed, shall be treated as part of its design only if the limitation or the effect it would have on emissions is federally enforceable or enforceable as a practical matter by the state.

"Predictive emissions monitoring system" or "PEMS" means all of the equipment necessary to monitor process and control device operational parameters (for example, control device secondary voltages and electric currents) and other information (for example, gas flow rate, O2 or CO2 concentrations), and calculate and record the mass emissions rate (for example, pounds per hour) on a continuous basis.

"Project" means a physical change in, or change in the method of operation of, an existing major stationary source.

"Projected actual emissions" means the maximum annual rate, in tons per year, at which an existing emissions unit is projected to emit a regulated NSR pollutant in any one of the five years (12-month period) following the date the unit resumes regular operation after the project, or in any one of the 10 years following that date, if the project involves increasing the emissions unit's design capacity or its potential to emit that regulated NSR pollutant and full utilization of the unit would result in a significant emissions increase or a significant net emissions increase at the major stationary source. In determining the projected actual emissions (before beginning actual construction), the owner of the major stationary source:

a. Shall consider all relevant information, including but not limited to, historical operational data, the company's own representations, the company's expected business activity and the company's highest projections of business activity, the company's filings with the state or federal regulatory authorities, and compliance plans under the approved implementation plan;

b. Shall include fugitive emissions to the extent quantifiable and emissions associated with startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions; and

c. Shall exclude, in calculating any increase in emissions that results from the particular project, that portion of the unit's emissions following the project that an existing unit could have emitted during the consecutive 24-month period used to establish the baseline actual emissions and that are also unrelated to the particular project, including any increased utilization due to product demand growth, provided such exclusion shall not reduce any calculated increases in emissions that are caused by, result from, or are related to the particular project; or

d. In lieu of using the method set out in subdivisions a through c of this definition, may elect to use the emissions unit's potential to emit, in tons per year.

"Reactivation of a very clean coal-fired electric utility steam generating unit" means any physical change or change in the method of operation associated with the commencement of commercial operations by a coal-fired utility unit after a period of discontinued operation where the unit:

a. Has not been in operation for the two-year period prior to the enactment of the federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and the emissions from such unit continue to be carried in the department's emissions inventory at the time of enactment;

b. Was equipped prior to shutdown with a continuous system of emissions control that achieves a removal efficiency for sulfur dioxide of no less than 85% and a removal efficiency for particulates of no less than 98%;

c. Is equipped with low-NOX burners prior to the time of commencement of operations following reactivation; and

d. Is otherwise in compliance with the requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Reasonably available control technology" or "RACT" means the lowest emission limit that a particular source is capable of meeting by the application of control technology that is reasonably available, considering technological and economic feasibility.

"Regulated NSR pollutant" means:

a. Any pollutant for which an ambient air quality standard has been promulgated. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) PM2.5 emissions and PM10 emissions shall include gaseous emissions from a source or activity that condense to form particulate matter at ambient temperatures. On or after January 1, 2011, such condensable particulate matter shall be accounted for in applicability determinations and in establishing emissions limitations for PM2.5 and PM10 issued under this article. Compliance with emissions limitations for PM2.5 and PM10 issued prior to this date shall not be based on condensable particulate matter unless required by the terms and conditions of the permit. Applicability determinations made prior to this date without accounting for condensable particulate matter shall not be considered in violation of this article.

(2) Any pollutant identified under this subdivision as a constituent or precursor to a pollutant for which an ambient air quality standard has been promulgated. Precursors identified for the purposes of this article shall be the following:

(a) Volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides are precursors to ozone in all attainment and unclassifiable areas.

(b) Sulfur dioxide is a precursor to PM2.5 in all attainment and unclassifiable areas.

(c) Nitrogen oxides are presumed to be precursors to PM2.5 in all attainment and unclassifiable areas, unless the board determines that emissions of nitrogen oxides from sources in a specific area are not a significant contributor to that area's ambient PM2.5 concentrations.

(d) Volatile organic compounds are presumed not to be precursors to PM2.5 in any attainment or unclassifiable area, unless the board determines that emissions of volatile organic compounds from sources in a specific area are a significant contributor to that area's ambient PM2.5 concentrations.

b. Any pollutant that is subject to any standard promulgated under § 111 of the federal Clean Air Act.

c. Any class I or II substance subject to a standard promulgated under or established by Title VI of the federal Clean Air Act.

d. Any pollutant that otherwise is subject to regulation under the federal Clean Air Act; except that any or all hazardous air pollutants either listed in § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act or added to the list pursuant to § 112(b)(2), which have not been delisted pursuant to § 112(b)(3), are not regulated NSR pollutants unless the listed hazardous air pollutant is also regulated as a constituent or precursor of a general pollutant listed under § 108 of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Replacement unit" means an emissions unit for which all the following criteria are met. No creditable emission reductions shall be generated from shutting down the existing emissions unit that is replaced.

a. The emissions unit is a reconstructed unit within the meaning of 40 CFR 60.15(b)(1), or the emissions unit completely takes the place of an existing emissions unit.

b. The emissions unit is identical to or functionally equivalent to the replaced emissions unit.

c. The replacement does not change the basic design parameters of the process unit.

d. The replaced emissions unit is permanently removed from the major stationary source, otherwise permanently disabled, or permanently barred from operation by a permit that is enforceable as a practical matter. If the replaced emissions unit is brought back into operation, it shall constitute a new emissions unit.

"Repowering" means:

a. Replacement of an existing coal-fired boiler with one of the following clean coal technologies: atmospheric or pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, magnetohydrodynamics, direct and indirect coal-fired turbines, integrated gasification fuel cells, or as determined by the administrator, in consultation with the Secretary of Energy, a derivative of one or more of these technologies, and any other technology capable of controlling multiple combustion emissions simultaneously with improved boiler or generation efficiency and with significantly greater waste reduction relative to the performance of technology in widespread commercial use as of November 15, 1990.

b. Repowering shall also include any oil and/or gas-fired unit which has been awarded clean coal technology demonstration funding as of January 1, 1991, by the Department of Energy.

c. The board may give expedited consideration to permit applications for any source that satisfies the requirements of this definition and is granted an extension under § 409 of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Secondary emissions" means emissions that would occur as a result of the construction or operation of a major stationary source or major modification, but do not come from the major stationary source or major modification itself. For the purpose of this article, secondary emissions shall be specific, well defined, quantifiable, and affect the same general area as the stationary source or modification that causes the secondary emissions. Secondary emissions include emissions from any offsite support facility that would not be constructed or increase its emissions except as a result of the construction or operation of the major stationary source or major modification. Secondary emissions do not include any emissions that come directly from a mobile source, such as emissions from the tailpipe of a motor vehicle, from a train, or from a vessel.

"Significant" means:

a. In reference to a net emissions increase or the potential of a source to emit any of the following pollutants, a rate of emissions that would equal or exceed any of the following rates:

Pollutant

Emissions Rate

Carbon Monoxide

100 tons per year (tpy)

Nitrogen Oxides

40 tpy

Sulfur Dioxide

40 tpy

Particulate Matter (TSP)

25 tpy

PM10

15 tpy

PM2.5

10 tpy of direct PM2.5 emissions;
40 tpy of SO2 emissions;
40 tpy of NOX emissions unless demonstrated not to be a PM2.5 precursor under the definition of "regulated NSR pollutant"

Ozone

40 tpy of volatile organic compounds or NOX

Lead

0.6 tpy

Fluorides

3 tpy

Sulfuric Acid Mist

7 tpy

Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)

10 tpy

Total Reduced Sulfur (including H2S)

10 tpy

Reduced Sulfur Compounds (including H2S)

10 tpy

Municipal waste combustor organics (measured as total tetra-through octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans)

3.5 x 10-6 tpy

Municipal waste combustor metals (measured as particulate matter)

15 tpy

Municipal waste combustor acid gases (measured as the sum of SO2 and HCl)

40 tpy

Municipal solid waste landfills emissions (measured as nonmethane organic compounds)

50 tpy

b. In reference to a net emissions increase or the potential of a source to emit a regulated NSR pollutant that subdivision a of this definition does not list, any emissions rate.

c. Notwithstanding subdivision a of this definition, any emissions rate or any net emissions increase associated with a major stationary source or major modification that would construct within 10 kilometers of a class I area and have an impact on such area equal to or greater than 1 μg/m3 (24-hour average).

"Significant emissions increase" means, for a regulated NSR pollutant, an increase in emissions that is significant for that pollutant.

"Significant emissions unit" means an emissions unit that emits or has the potential to emit a PAL pollutant in an amount that is significant for that PAL pollutant, but less than the amount that would qualify the unit as a major emissions unit.

"Small emissions unit" means an emissions unit that emits or has the potential to emit the PAL pollutant in an amount less than the significant level for that PAL pollutant.

"State enforceable" means all limitations and conditions that are enforceable as a practical matter, including any regulation of the board, those requirements developed pursuant to 9VAC5-170-160, requirements within any applicable order or variance, and any permit requirements established pursuant to this chapter.

"State operating permit" means a permit issued under the state operating permit program.

"State operating permit program" means an operating permit program (i) for issuing limitations and conditions for stationary sources; (ii) promulgated to meet the EPA's minimum criteria for federal enforceability, including adequate notice and opportunity for the EPA and public comment prior to issuance of the final permit, and practicable enforceability; and (iii) codified in Article 5 (9VAC5-80-800 et seq.) of this part.

"Stationary source" means any building, structure, facility, or installation that emits or may emit a regulated NSR pollutant.

"Temporary clean coal technology demonstration project" means a clean coal technology demonstration project that is operated for a period of five years or less, and that complies with the applicable implementation plan and other requirements necessary to attain and maintain the ambient air quality standards during the project and after it is terminated.

Statutory Authority

§ 10.1-1308 of the Code of Virginia; Clean Air Act (§§ 110, 112, 165, 173, and 182 and Title V); 40 CFR Parts 51, 61, 63, 70, and 72.

Historical Notes

Derived from Volume 22, Issue 23, eff. September 1, 2006; amended, Virginia Register Volume 25, Issue 06, eff. December 31, 2008; Volume 25, Issue 20, eff. July 23, 2009; Volume 27, Issue 11, eff. March 2, 2011; Volume 27, Issue 23, eff. August 17, 2011; Volume 29, Issue 17, eff. May 22, 2013; Volume 31, Issue 22, eff. August 13, 2015.

Website addresses provided in the Virginia Administrative Code to documents incorporated by reference are for the reader's convenience only, may not necessarily be active or current, and should not be relied upon. To ensure the information incorporated by reference is accurate, the reader is encouraged to use the source document described in the regulation.

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