Code of Virginia

Code of Virginia
Title 55.1. Property and Conveyances
10/26/2020

Article 1. Electric Fences.

§ 55.1-2800. Definition.

As used in this article, "electric fence" means a fence designed to conduct electric current along one or more wires of such fence so that a person or animal touching any such wire or wires will receive an electric shock.

1982, c. 280, § 55-298.4; 2019, c. 712.

§ 55.1-2801. Unlawful to sell, distribute, construct, install, maintain, or use certain electric fences upon agricultural land.

A. It is unlawful for any person to sell, distribute, construct, install, maintain, or use upon any land used for agricultural purposes or, for any person exercising supervision or control over any such land, to permit any other person to construct, install, maintain, or use any electric fence energized with an electric charge unless the charge is regulated by a controlling device. Except as otherwise provided in this article, such controlling device shall display the approved label of and shall conform to the safety standards promulgated by the Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., in its publication number UL69, dated June 30, 2009, and entitled "Standard for Safety for Electric-Fence Controllers," as the same may from time to time be supplemented, or shall display the approved label of and meet the safety standards promulgated by the International Electrotechnical Commission in its publication IEC 60335-2-76, second edition (BS EN 69335-2-76), as the same may from time to time be supplemented.

B. No metallically continuous fence or set of electrically connected fences shall be supplied by more than one controlling device.

C. Any controlling device shall be suitably grounded when placed in service.

1982, c. 280, § 55-298.1; 2019, c. 712.

§ 55.1-2802. Unlawful to sell other controlling devices unless they meet certain standards.

A. A controlling device that does not conform to the requirements of § 55.1-2801 shall not be sold, distributed, constructed, installed, maintained, or used unless it meets the following standards:

1. A peak-discharge-output type controlling device that delivers intermittent current of a value not in excess of four milliampere-seconds for a maximum "on" period of two-tenths second and a minimum "off" period of three-quarters second. The mean value of the peak output from such device shall progressively decrease from four milliampere-seconds at maximum "on" periods of both two-tenths and one-tenth second to three and two-tenths milliampere-seconds at six-hundredths second, one and nine-tenths milliampere-seconds at three-hundredths second, and consequently to shorter "on" periods as output current increases.

2. A sinusoidal-output type controlling device that delivers an intermittent current of a value not in excess of five milliamperes for a maximum "on" period of two-tenths second and a minimum "off" period of nine-tenths second. The effective value of the output from such device may increase as the "on" period decreases, increasing from 40 milliamperes for one-tenth second to 57 milliamperes for five-hundredths second, and 65 milliamperes for twenty-seven thousandths second.

3. Any other type of controlling device that delivers a maximum intermittent current output of a value not in excess of four milliampere-seconds for a maximum "on" period of two-tenths second and a minimum "off" period of nine-tenths second.

B. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection A, no electric fence controlling device shall be sold, distributed, constructed, installed, maintained, or used that will permit for longer than one second an uninterrupted electric current on the fence with an effective value in excess of five milliamperes when the load, including the measuring device, is not less than 450 ohms nor more than 550 ohms.

1982, c. 280, §§ 55-298.2, 55-298.3; 2019, c. 712.

§ 55.1-2803. Penalty.

Any person who violates any provision of this article is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

1982, c. 280, § 55-298.5; 2019, c. 712.

The chapters of the acts of assembly referenced in the historical citation at the end of these sections may not constitute a comprehensive list of such chapters and may exclude chapters whose provisions have expired.

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